News Reporting

Entrepreneurs cautioned on prepping for angel investors

Milwaukee-area entrepreneurs hoping to apply for funds to get their start-up companies off the ground got a dose of hard reality on Thursday from representatives of Wisconsin’s 2-year-old Super Angel Fund. “It’s not enough to have a great idea,” said Tom Schuster, the fund’s general managing partner,
who addressed about 75 businessmen and women at a Wisconsin Innovation Network luncheon in Wauwatosa.

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Moody: Patients like hybrid health systems

In 1993, Mark Moody was thrilled to be offered a chance to live and work for two years in New Zealand, where the country was undergoing a radical change to its longtime health care system. He was there, working for Aetna, when New Zealand decided to experiment with expanding privatization within its longtime government-run national health care system.

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Sebelius: ‘Disingenuous’ for Supreme Court to overturn insurance subsidies

Former U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius told WisBusiness.com on Tuesday it would be “disingenuous” for the U.S. Supreme Court to conclude that health care subsidies under Obamacare are illegal in three dozen states, including Wisconsin. “I hope the court will read the law in its whole and rule that what was intended is clearly what was set up,” she said in an interview in Milwaukee.

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Johnson Controls considers branching out in energy storage business

As Americans increasingly clamor for renewable energy sources to supplement utility power grids, Glendale-based Johnson Controls is exploring a possible new product line: energy storage hubs. “We have a building efficiency business, we have a battery business and we have automotive,” said Brian Dillard, executive director of systems electronics and integration for Johnson Controls. “Energy storage kind of fits somewhere in between buildings and batteries for us. It’s a new area that we’re focused on.”

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Industry execs: Boosting renewable use not a simple process

Despite a clear call from voters for power utilities to increase wind, solar and other renewable energy sources, industry executives agreed in Milwaukee that’s going to be expensive and complicated. Many residents and businesses are intrigued by the idea of installing solar panels and wind turbines that would feed carbon- and pollution-free energy into major utility grids — with the goal of helping the environment, lowering their energy bills and perhaps even “selling” excess energy to the utility. But building the physical facilities and a fair pricing structure won’t be easy or cheap, panelists warned Tuesday at the 2015 Mid-America Regulatory Conference annual meeting in Milwaukee.

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New York Times

5 Killed in Shooting at Molson Coors in Milwaukee

In a city renowned for its brewing tradition, the sprawling Molson Coors campus was an icon in itself, a place known for decades to Milwaukee locals as the
old Miller Brewery. But on Wednesday afternoon, officials said, a worker still in his uniform stormed the facility and began shooting. He killed five people, all fellow employees. “It’s frightening,” said Representative Gwen Moore, a Democrat whose district includes Milwaukee, and whose congressional office includes a Miller High Life sign.

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News Reporting

WisBusiness.com–Industry execs: Boosting renewable use not a simple process

Despite a clear call from voters for power utilities to increase wind, solar and other renewable energy sources, industry executives agreed in Milwaukee that’s going to be expensive and complicated. Many residents and businesses are intrigued by the idea of installing solar panels and wind turbines that would feed carbon- and pollution-free energy into major utility grids — with the goal of helping the environment, lowering their energy bills and perhaps even “selling” excess energy to the utility.

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Diversity IS

The Independent School Mindset on Physical Disabilities Is Still Behind the Times, Experts Say

Independent K-12 schools have been required by law to open their doors to people with physical disabilities, including those who use wheelchairs, for nearly 30 years. Though they provide physical accommodations for students with disabilities, some schools struggle to overcome a “mindset” that prevents them from even considering enrolling such students, says Tom Glassberg.

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Insight Into Diversity

Inconsistent Mental Healthcare at Community Colleges Harms a Vulnerable Student Population

In August 2017, just as the Houston Community College System’s 20 campuses were poised to start the fall semester, Hurricane Harvey dumped more than 60 inches of rain in four days over southeastern Texas. More than 200,000 Houston-area homes and apartment buildings were destroyed along with up to a million cars. Many students as well as faculty and staff suddenly were displaced from their homes, had lost their possessions, and had no way to get to classes.

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